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Invisible music : Angela Carter and folk song / by Polly Paulusma

By: Paulusma, PollyContributor(s): Vaughan Williams Memorial LibraryMaterial type: FilmFilmSeries: Library LecturesPublication details: London : English Folk Dance and Song Society, 2020Description: 1 online resource (1 video file (46 min.)) : sound, colourSubject(s): Carter, Angela | Folk song | Folk revivalOnline resources: Streaming video. Summary: It is a surprisingly little-known fact that the novelist Angela Carter was a folk singer in the 1960s second-wave folk revival. A newly unearthed archive reveals that she not only co-founded a folk club in the 1960s with her first husband, folk producer Paul Carter, but that she also sang there fortnightly for several years. This lecture will firstly collate some of the evidence of Carter’s folk singing praxis through revealing some key details from the newly-discovered archive, as well as passages from Carter’s 1960s diaries, the album sleeve-notes she authored for Topic releases and recordings of her singing and playing. We will take a look at some extracts from her undergraduate dissertation on folk song’s relationship with medieval poetry, and her 1964 student article ’Now is the Time for Singing’ which was published in Bristol University’s student magazine Nonesuch, to get a picture of how she felt about folk song at that time, and how highly she regarded it as an art form. [. . . ]
List(s) this item appears in: Recently catalogued
Holdings: Online Resources

Streaming video.

Lecture given by Polly Paulusma on Wednesday 20 March, 2019 at Cecil Sharp House as part of the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library lecture series.

It is a surprisingly little-known fact that the novelist Angela Carter was a folk singer in the 1960s second-wave folk revival. A newly unearthed archive reveals that she not only co-founded a folk club in the 1960s with her first husband, folk producer Paul Carter, but that she also sang there fortnightly for several years.

This lecture will firstly collate some of the evidence of Carter’s folk singing praxis through revealing some key details from the newly-discovered archive, as well as passages from Carter’s 1960s diaries, the album sleeve-notes she authored for Topic releases and recordings of her singing and playing.

We will take a look at some extracts from her undergraduate dissertation on folk song’s relationship with medieval poetry, and her 1964 student article ’Now is the Time for Singing’ which was published in Bristol University’s student magazine Nonesuch, to get a picture of how she felt about folk song at that time, and how highly she regarded it as an art form. [. . . ]

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