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Barn dances, Ceilidhs and knees ups : social folk dance in England, 1945-2020 / by Chloe Middleton-Metcalfe

By: Middleton-Metcalfe, ChloeContributor(s): Vaughan Williams Memorial LibraryMaterial type: FilmFilmSeries: Library LecturesPublication details: London : English Folk Dance and Song Society, 2020Description: 1 online resource (1 video file (59 min.)) : sound, colourOther title: Library lecture : social folk dance in England, 1945–2020 by Chloe Middleton-MetcalfeSubject(s): Social dance | Folk danceOnline resources: Streaming video. Summary: What has folk dancing got to do with Butlins holiday camps? Or the British Royal Family? Why do people think that folk dancing should be fun? Why are all the dances walked? Why are callers reluctant to call themselves teachers? Why is English folk dance not taught in schools anymore? What has any of this got to do with Englishness and national identity? In this illustrated talk Chloe Middleton-Metcalfe selects the most interesting and challenging stories from her PhD. Valiantly battling against years of academic marginalisation she presents an array of fascinating stories about the most theoretically neglected English ‘folk’ dance form.
List(s) this item appears in: Recently catalogued
Holdings: Online Resources

Streaming video.

Lecture given by Chloe Middleton-Metcalf on Wednesday 12 February 2020 at Cecil Sharp House as part of the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library lecture series.

What has folk dancing got to do with Butlins holiday camps? Or the British Royal Family? Why do people think that folk dancing should be fun? Why are all the dances walked? Why are callers reluctant to call themselves teachers? Why is English folk dance not taught in schools anymore? What has any of this got to do with Englishness and national identity? In this illustrated talk Chloe Middleton-Metcalfe selects the most interesting and challenging stories from her PhD. Valiantly battling against years of academic marginalisation she presents an array of fascinating stories about the most theoretically neglected English ‘folk’ dance form.

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